Browsing All Posts filed under »The Discipline«

Scientism is a Non-Threat: Considering Susan Haack and the Role of Philosophy

October 16, 2017 by

4

“The school is in financial crisis,” reports a friend and emeritus professor as I take my seat at the table in the back corner of a campus coffee shop and bookstore. We meet monthly with the frequency and punctuality expected from five philosophers: every six weeks, 15 minutes late. Professor Haack greets readers with just […]

A Philosophy for Talking about Philosophy

September 19, 2017 by

0

Some people become philosophers (or academics, more generally) because they want to be able to teach; they want to be experts in a subject and engage with the world and influence the beliefs and actions of others in a positive way. I think that’s a great and admirable reason to become an academic; I have […]

Public Philosophy in the PhD

June 4, 2017 by

4

We in the philosophy blogosophere (especially) frequently discuss whether activities like blogging, podcasting, and other public philosophy activities or projects should count toward tenure. I fall squarely in the `yes’ camp – engaging audiences outside of our professional circles is vitally important for the discipline. And the APA officially agrees. It is also important for […]

Teaching as a Grad Student: Logic End of Semester

May 23, 2017 by

Comments Off on Teaching as a Grad Student: Logic End of Semester

This is the 5th post in this series, and the third about my experience teaching for the first time (see parts one, and two). As of a couple of weeks ago, I finally managed to submit the final marks for the Logic I course I had been teaching, marking the end of my responsibilities for […]

Teaching as a Grad Student: Guest Lecturing on Logicism

April 26, 2017 by

Comments Off on Teaching as a Grad Student: Guest Lecturing on Logicism

I was recently given the opportunity to give a lecture on Frege’s logicism and related topics for our Logic III course (cross-listed as an undergraduate and a graduate course). That class had gotten up to the point of looking at second-order Peano Arithmetic, which is a natural jumping off point for looking at the logic […]

Philosopher-Scientists, Scientist-Philosophers and Philosopher- Philosophers: An Exercise in Futurology

April 17, 2017 by

14

Futurology comprises the study of possible futures and, as such, it is a cheap thing: it does not require much to speculate about how things can be in the years to come. Futurology also produces inaccurate predictions most of the time, which could render this post useless. Nevertheless, here I am concerned with the future […]

Cognitive Dissonance and Philosophy

April 5, 2017 by

8

I want to first give credit to the authors of “Mistakes Were Made (but not by me)” – Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson. Their talk of cognitive dissonance and the metaphor of the ‘pyramid of choice’ has inspired my comments below. Although the ideas in this book have obvious ramifications for psychology, psychotherapy, political science, […]