Browsing All posts tagged under »Samir Chopra«

On the Nature of Forgiveness

September 26, 2017 by

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Many moons ago I wrote a very brief blog post on the nature of forgiveness. Since then I’ve presented some work on forgiveness, I’ve edited a collection where forgiveness was one of the chapters discussed in the volume, and I’ve read tons on the subject. I’m sad to report that forgiveness still evades me. Though […]

On The Moral Psychology of Social Media

September 25, 2017 by

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When one researches within the domain of moral psychology their aim is mostly to investigate human functioning within a specific or general moral context. These investigations may impact wider debates being had in the domain of ethical theory. In this short post I’d like to think out loud a bit about the moral psychology of […]

Have Gun, Will Settle Dispute: The Dangerous, Alluring Temptation

June 14, 2016 by

Comments Off on Have Gun, Will Settle Dispute: The Dangerous, Alluring Temptation

Originally posted on Samir Chopra:
I’ve seen fights, disputes, grow, fester, erupt into bouts of violence: disagreements become irrevocable, boundaries are crossed, and then, tempers flare. Punches and slaps are thrown, sometimes half-heartedly, sometimes in a desperate flurry, sometimes shirt collars are grabbed as the ‘fight’ turns into an ungainly grappling session with headholds and…

Mass Incarceration And The ‘Overfederalization’ Of Crime

May 15, 2016 by

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Originally posted on Samir Chopra:
America’s mass incarceration is the bastard child of many. Among them: racism, the War on Drugs (itself a racist business), the evisceration of the Constitution through ideological interpretive strategies, prosecutorial misconduct, police brutality, and so on. Yet other culprits may be found elsewhere, in other precincts of the legal and…

Stephen Jay Gould’s Weak Argument For Science And Religion’s ‘Separate Domains’

May 11, 2016 by

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Originally posted on Samir Chopra:
Stephen Jay Gould‘s famous ‘Two Separate Domains‘ argues, roughly, that religion and science operate in different domains of inquiry, and as such do not conflict with each other: We get the age of rocks, and religion retains the rock of ages; we study how the heavens go, and they determine…