Browsing All posts tagged under »Philosophy«

Scientism is a Non-Threat: Considering Susan Haack and the Role of Philosophy

October 16, 2017 by

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“The school is in financial crisis,” reports a friend and emeritus professor as I take my seat at the table in the back corner of a campus coffee shop and bookstore. We meet monthly with the frequency and punctuality expected from five philosophers: every six weeks, 15 minutes late. Professor Haack greets readers with just […]

The Further Adventures of Hero and Hera.

September 27, 2017 by

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Those familiar with the neo-logicism literature, may also be familiar with the characters Hero and Hera. Hero was introduced by Crispin Wright in the late `90s, and the story Hero and his sister Hera was fleshed out by Philip Ebert and Marcus Rossberg in 2007*. In that paper, we learn that Hero and Hera both […]

Grinworthy Quotes 13

August 9, 2017 by

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Avicenna and Gentile da Foligno, woodcut (extract), edition of the Canon and its commentary by Gentile da Foligno, Venice 1520. Public domain via Wikipedia Commons     This gem: At Physics II.8, however, Avicenna had undertaken a detailed analysis and critique of the idea of void and found it empty… is on page 19 of Jon […]

CFP: Western Canadian Philosophical Association

June 15, 2017 by

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I am very pleased to announce that the 54th meeting of the Western Canadian Philosophical Association (with CSEP-SCEP) will be held in my hometown university, the University of Regina from October 13th to 15th, 2017.  Having completed my undergraduate degree there, I have fond memories of the Department of Philosophy and Classics in Regina including […]

On the So Called “Grey Areas” of Sexual Consent

May 20, 2017 by

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Sexual consent has been the foundation of sexual ethics for many modern thinkers of sexuality. The notion itself stretches back to at least Immanuel Kant, who presented some arguments for why we should generally respect an individual’s autonomy. Respect for autonomy is the idea that we should respect a person’s capacity to make self-governing decisions […]

Cognitive Dissonance and Philosophy

April 5, 2017 by

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I want to first give credit to the authors of “Mistakes Were Made (but not by me)” – Carol Tavris and Elliot Aronson. Their talk of cognitive dissonance and the metaphor of the ‘pyramid of choice’ has inspired my comments below. Although the ideas in this book have obvious ramifications for psychology, psychotherapy, political science, […]

Teaching as a Grad Student: Philosophy of Science

January 25, 2017 by

Comments Off on Teaching as a Grad Student: Philosophy of Science

Thanks to Aaron for starting this series. There are particular challenges that grad students might face as instructors, some of which I imagine are exclusive to grad students, whereas others could probably be generalized to new professors on the track. And perhaps in my case, grad students, new professors on the track, and maybe even […]